‘Supermarket’ supermarket aisle is a must for all shoppers

A supermarket aisle has been designed to ensure you buy locally.

It has been devised in collaboration with Australian grocery giant Aldi, which has partnered with local food giant Green & Blue to create a wide range of local produce, meat, dairy, fish and seafood products.

The Australian National University (ANU) has spent six months working with Green &amps; Blue and other local suppliers to design the new aisle, which is designed to “provide a greater range of locally sourced products and ingredients”.

“It’s very much about having a supermarket that’s not just for shoppers and shoppers that come in, but also people that work at the store,” ANU lecturer and senior lecturer in food studies Dr Michael O’Leary told ABC News.

“It means that the shelf space, which used to be dominated by a couple of things that are locally sourced, can be opened up to make room for the more complex things.”

Dr O’Donnell said the new product line was a response to the Australian Food Safety and Standards Authority (AFSA) findings that some foods were contaminated by the chemicals found in Aldi’s processed foods.

“These findings are very concerning,” he said.

“I think it’s important to look at what is actually in these products, so that people can make informed choices about what they buy.”

He said the range of products on offer could be tailored to individual shoppers’ preferences.

“We think that the product range we’ve developed, it’s really not geared to a particular consumer,” he told ABC Radio Melbourne.

“For example, it might be for someone that doesn’t like tomatoes, but maybe they like some of the other fruits that have been identified in the food packaging.”

Aldi has said it is working closely with local suppliers.

The ABC’s Sarah Williams reported from Melbourne.

Why does the world’s best supermarket delivery company need to hire new staff?

More than 2,000 people are currently working at the global giant United supermarkets, but one of the jobs in question has been on the chopping block.

The company has been in talks to fill the gap with a new delivery driver, according to a report by The Wall Street Journal.

The new driver will work for a fixed number of hours a week, with the first job set to take place in early 2019.

However, that job is expected to take on average 14 hours of daily driving time.

The Journal reported that United’s latest plans were for a new driver to start in September, but that it would have to find another driver within two weeks.

The article also said that United is looking to hire 100 more people to fill that new driver position.

The jobs at the supermarket will require drivers to be able to drive through busy roads, including busy highways and some of the most congested roads in the world, such as the US-Mexico border.